Link between asthma and COVID-19?

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Canadian researchers may have found link between asthma and COVID-19

Researchers from Canada may have found a link between asthma and COVID-19 syndrome. As clarified by the Canadian Medical Association Journal, there seems to be evidence of correlation between the two. The U.S. CDC guidelines also support a link between asthma and COVID-19.

For instance, researcher Abrams, Jong and Yang indicate how those with asthma are among the most represented of all adult patients. Furthermore, many health officials are moving towards promoting awareness in asthmatic patients.

However, the research needs more support and evidence, as current literature is scarce regarding the interplay between asthma and COVID-19. In other words, the new findings are not conclusive, and there are still many ‘limitations’ according to Abrams.

‘In general, viruses are a very common cause of asthma exacerbation, but it’s important to know that different viruses do interplay with asthma differently’. Abrams also clarifies that during SARS in 2003, complications of asthma decreased as Canadians took up stronger hygiene habits.

What should asthmatic Canadians do?

One important missing link in the research is the lack of data from Wuhan. The data made available by the Chinese source does not show any strong correlation between asthma and COVID-19, thus making it difficult to draw conclusions. Likewise, it is same way perplexing how the link seems to represent merely adults with asthma. Children do not exhibit such correlation. In other words, there is not enough data to support a link between children with asthma and COVID-19.

‘We don’t know enough about how this virus interacts with children who have asthma — we just don’t have the data in our pediatric population’, says Abrams. ‘So while asthma is listed as a risk factor in adults, it isn’t in children to date’. Such disparity is just one of the the many puzzling things about coronavirus since its discovery.

So what should Canadians with asthma do? Abrams advises to maintain a high level of hygiene and to stay on your current medication. Above all, avoid nebulizers: they can aerosolise the virus and make transmission more likely.